News Archive

Decoding the Maternal Brain

July 3, 2014

The above-linked YouTube video presents a talk given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Laura Glynn shares her interesting research findings on the maternal brain and highlights the different changes that occur in a mother’s brain during the perinatal period. She also demonstrates the various positive and negative adaptations that occur as a result of the restructuring of the maternal brain during this time.

Laura Glynn is an associate professor of Psychology at Chapman University. She received undergraduate degrees in Economics and Psychology at U.C. Davis and her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at U.C. San Diego. Dr. Glynn has published extensively in the field of maternal-child health with a particular interest in the perinatal period. Her research focuses on questions such as: Why do women give birth to babies that are born early or small?; How does fetal experience shape the health and development of infants and children?; Does the prenatal period represent a critical period of neurological development, not only for the fetus, but for the mother, too?

Styled view of a hippocampal neuron dendrite. The delicate protrusions that carry excitatory synapses, dendritic spines, are visible. (Courtesy Dr Y. Chen)

“Styled view of a hippocampal neuron dendrite. The delicate protrusions that carry excitatory synapses, dendritic spines, are visible.” (Courtesy Dr Y. Chen)


Getting Inside the Child Mind

October 7, 2013

With a major neurology award and $10 million in funding, Dr. Tallie Z. Baram strives to understand early-life brain development. Dr. Baram received the 2013 Bernard Sachs Award at the Child Neurology Society’s Nov. 1, 2013 annual meeting.

NIH awards UCI $10 million to study early-life origins of adolescent mental disorders

June 11, 2013

Funding will support effort to understand developmental impact of maternal signals. With $10 million in new federal funding, UC Irvine researchers will study how maternal signals and care before and after birth may increase an infant’s vulnerability to adolescent cognitive and emotional problems, such as risky behaviors, addiction and depression (UC Irvine News story).